articles and other information about hans van krieken

The greater Asheville area is the author's home area

Bird nest idea

Hans' Articles

 

 

     hans van krieken in the good old times
             Hans in his sailing days

      Abstract Digital art Schemes
                                 Hans and his wife Carol
  

  







     





     Carol and Hans van Krieken


     Hans an Krieken, in his younger years, on his boat "Bacchus"

  Bird Nest

bird's nest made from cut-down nursery plant pot

Bird nest made from bottom half of commercial flowerpot. Hang in secluded spot (under rafters of a carport or such.

I filled the nest with some coconut husk material used in coconut husk flower containers. It works great.

 

 

  Listed below Are Articles by Hans van Krieken 

On the subjects of religion and spirituality:

 

Propaganda, Systems of Deceit Are the Platforms in the Formation of Spiritual Planes of Reality

There is No Other Way to Bring Truth to the People, But to Sell it to Them

The Spiritually Deadly Game of Religious Physical Life

Mental Force Shields Are the Product of Believed Deceitful Propaganda   

Human Emotions Present in Matter, Plants and Animals Explained

Cosmic Propaganda Makes the Soul Poor in Truth and the Physical Person Rich in Lies Believed

Orthodoxy Explained

Pain Relief and Healing - Good and Evil in Earth and in Spirit

Your Religion Stance - Re-evaluate It

 

The Shack by William P Young - Propaganda Reinforcing Spiritual Propaganda of the Universe

A Critique - The Shack by William P Young

To Be Or Not to Be, That is the Question- - To Be is Being Spirit, Not to Be is Being Physical

Physical Awareness - A Spiritual Dream State

Basic Difference Between Humans and Animals

Psychological Depression - The Natural State For Humanity

Spiritual Deceit - The Foundation of the Universe

What Kind of Realm is the Physical Universe and Why Are We Here?

Concepts of Reality

By What Method Does One Arrive at the Ideas and Images of Hell and Heaven?

Love, Sermon on the Mount - The True Meaning!

Hypocrisy of Christendom

Christians Cannot Love Two Masters - Why Do Christians Do So Anyway?

What Kind of Realm is the Physical Universe and Why Are We Here?

Do Not Take the Name of the Lord in Vain

Universal Consciousness - The Great Deceiver and Pretender

Forms of Reality - In Truth and In Power, Or In Fiction and In Utter Helplessness

 

On the subject of politics:

 

The Present Financial Crisis Was Manufactured Since the Start of the 21 Century

The One World Order - How to Follow Its Tracks

Financial Crises - The Federal Reserve System's Tracks

The Financial Crisis in Early Fall of 2008 - Cause and Culprits

Censorship in America

Private Power, Wealth & Status - It's Advantages and the Really Big Disadvantage

 

On the subject of investing is horse race bets:

                                                                      Bet Smart & Invest Cautiously - The Reasons Why


On the subject of boat design:

 

Click to read articles posted on ezinearticles.com

 

Revolutionary super fast, super shallow, inter-ocean surfing hull design.

This design is as of July 13, 2010 US Patent # 7752986 to Johannes P van Krieken.

Aspects of this patent can save water-borne shipping companies billions of dollars in fuel consumption, dry-docking fees and time.

 

Above, an ad I ran in Latitude 38 Magazine in 2008

This design has been assigned US Patent #7752986  B2

       USpatent 7752986 B2 cover front page USpatent 7752986 B2

For information on a license for producing this hull design please contact http://www.millenniumip.com/Contact/tabid/202/Default.aspx.

Below is an ad that ran in Latitude 38 magazine before the patent was granted.

Design aspects of this hull can be produced in sizes from about 17 ft to 500 ft in length..   

hans-van-krieken boat patent

The rotors under the hull replace the conventional rudder(s) that, in many cases, forego the need for side thrusters on ships. The rotors can be used to keep a hull away from docks and pillars when moored in a current so preventing damage to hull sides and mooring cables and hawsers. Most moored vessels are in an environment of current.

The rotors allow ships the freedom to move sideways (yaw) parallel to the course line. Such a movement prevents the stern from moving too far over when an impromptu sharp turning maneuver is needed such as when it might be in an imminent collision situation. The rotors’ placements and designs are highly useful in arrival and departure procedures to and from docks, especially when a current is present. These rotors and their uses are unique in maritime history.

Rotors are also much more reliable than standard rudders in maneuvering in narrow canals such as the Baltimore Chesapeake Canal. Rudders change the course of a vessel by forcing the stern sideways with respect to the bow.  Rotors allow the bows and the stern to move so that such large swings of the stern are prevented and make navigating narrow canals much easier and saver.

Some fins of the rotors can be made to be retracted or folded so that under high speed the fins create less friction and yet keep the vessel under full control.

My super fast, super shallow design can make an enormous difference in commercial river vessels moving people and cargo. The shallowness of the hull (especially at higher speed ranges) when used in conjunction with power drives exceeds all standard means of fuel conservation now available for inland water transport. Up-current trips are much shorter in time reducing exposure to the current and thus conserve fuel . Also, the shallowness of the hull allows for much straighter paths on winding rivers such as in the Mississippi river system - deep displacement hulls must follow the channels accurately while my hull design can make all the available shortcuts or keep all parts of the hull closely centered in a very narrow channel.

The widening hull feature is unique in comparison with technologies now used. (I cannot find the word planing used for boats moving over the surface rather than through so I use planing. I believe planing is also used)

The means to keep the trapped air under the hull is unique. Air must flow under the hull, not be trapped as the main source of friction-reduction. Air escaping along the hull to the surface in the immediate wake of the hull reduces the amount of water that is dragged along with the hull. Therefore the hull is moving much less water along than when the air is merely trapped stationary with respect to the hull. This is a great feature.

Having now technologies available to force air under the hull narrowness of hull is becoming obsolete because the air under the hull makes narrow displacement type hulls unnecessary. The more bottom surface a planing hull has the greater carrying capacity it has at sharply reduced friction coefficients.

The future is to fast planing vessels (of all sizes) and not to deep displacement-type vessels because air-cushioned, broad beamed, planing vessels such as my design incorporates use a fraction of the fuel that displacement type vessels use. My design also has displacement features that compete favorably with current displacement-type hull designs.

The difference compares air shipment to maritime and marine type shipping.

An airplane can take on less cargo and less passengers per trip than water-borne vessels but they can make so many more trips that airplanes compete in many areas of transport in a superior manner over waterborne crafts. Cargo arrives much faster to its destination which is a great feature. So also, a super-fast planing cargo or passenger vessel can compete with huge ships of the displacement type in moving items in a much shorter time. Smaller vessels also have the advantage to always be able to sail fully loaded while huge ships sometimes sail almost completely empty. I know I was a former shipmate.

 

 

Design configurations of this patent when incorporated in maritime and inland ship designs can save shipping companies much time, in-transit fuel consumption and dry-docking fees. Also, since less fuel is consumed less sulpher-bearing chemicals are released into the air. I like to make some comparisons when aspects of my patent are incorporated in the motor vessel Emma Maersk and in present-day conventional ships moving at speeds between 18 and 21 knots.

The motor vessel Emma Maersk

            Country of origin - Denmark 
           Length - 1,302 ft 
           Width / beam - 184 ft
                                                                                         Draft - 51 ft
           Net cargo - 123,200 tons  
           Engine - 14 cylinders in-line diesel engine (110,000 BHP)  
           Cruise Speed - 29 miles per hour
  
           Cargo capacity - 15,000 TEU (1 TEU = 20 cubic feet)   
           Construction cost - US $145,000,000+ 
Silicone paint applied to the ship's bottom reduces water resistance and   saves 317,000 gallons of diesel per year. http://www.emma-maersk.info/, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_M%C3%A6rsk

   I tried Teflon paint on the bottom of  my sailboat in 1980. I hoped that the Teflon would prevent marine growth and increase speed.
  
The boat did go faster than before but only for a week when marine growth started to adhere to the bottom. After 5 weeks the marine growth was so severe that I had to haul out again, grind away the Teflon and apply the regular anti-fouling paint I had been using.

 


  The silicon paint that was applied to the bottom of Emma Maersk works because the marine growth that attaches itself to the hull has a very infirm grip on the silicone paint. The ship's high speed simply forces the growth right off the hull.


   On cruising sailboats such paint does not work because sailboats do not move fast enough to force the marine growth off the hull.
   Also, the longer a hull is the more the hull's stability and the hull speed increase. So, it is not a technological wonder that this monster vessel can go faster than conventional, shorter ships.
   The Emma Maersk must be dry-docked regularly which operations cost the operators much money in dry-dock fees and lost time. My patent, however, provides any hull with continuous marine-fouling protection so that these costs are non-existent. The draft to beam ratio make the Emma Maersk an ideal prospect for the design innovations of the above mentioned patent.
  
For instance, just a percentage of the exhaust energy recovered from exhaust fumes as is done in the Maersk vessel could compress and force a sufficient amount of air under the forward section of the hull. This air, traveling gratis all along the bottom of the hull, would reduce bottom friction considerably. When the trapped air rises at the stern the air would expand and help break up the low pressure at the stern to reduce the volume of the column of water dragged along in the vessel's wake.
   These are some of the aspects of  my patent-claims that give a superior slickness to the hull so that, when used on a vessel the size of the Emma Maersk, these innovations could increase its speed even more or save fuel while cruising at the same speed.

  My patent claims also mean that smaller sized ships may begin to compete with this monster ship in speed and in total cost of shipping.
 
 
Also, my patented hull design would make marvelous life vessels as these hulls would swiftly bring an endangered crew to the safety of the nearest harbor. The life vessel would be a blast on passenger ships as entertainment underway as well as when the ship is at anchor or docked.

 

The above shown super shallow, super fast, radical hull at DWL 50 ft is the optimum length to surf well developed ocean swells and also is an excellent cruising sailboat. This hull has no keel, no permanent ballast and no conventional rudder.

 

The design lends itself to sailing craft to about 300 ft and motor vessels up to 500 ft for both inland and coastal use. As a surfing platform it can be designed in lengths of 25 ft to about 85 ft. It must comfortably fit on the forward slope of the swells it is designed to ride as a surfing platform.

 

The bottom of the hull can be fabricated using conventional methods in monel or copper-clad steel, aluminum or conceivably fiberglass. The reason for copper-clad is that the bottom must always be as smooth and clean as possible in order to get all the speed producing innovations to work right. The metal alloy monel has sufficient copper in its alloy to prevent marine growth.

 

The hull will go over 50 knots at sustained speeds with sufficient wind and/or trade wind like swells. This particular hull design (LWL of 50 ft) is 18 ft wide at the turn of the bows into the sides and the beam continues to increase from the turn of the bows at about a 4o angle with respect to the centerline to reach a beam of about 21 ft at the stern. The bottom is substantially flat. The hull has no keel, no permanent internal ballast, and it has no conventional rudder. Hull static draft is 1 ft and including the steering fins the draft is about 1½ ft. She begins to plane almost immediately reducing overall draft to about 10 inches. She has German-design, vari-props that go automatically in vane stand when the motors stop and automatically deploy when the motors are engaged in forward. Once the motor gear lever has been placed in forward there is no need to use the motor gear shift as the prop has its own forward and reverse lever.

 

The flat bottom incorporates two steering and course stabilizing rotors on which sets of fins are mounted. These rotors are in lieu of a rudder. They are also used in special tandem routines while planing or surfing the hull.

 

The bows sections and the intersections of the bottom with the sides are equipped with multiple sets of pressurized air nozzles and the hull is equipped with multiple sets of crosswise venturi slots that suck air under the hull in great quantities as the hull speed increases above10 knots. The venturi arrays have much more sophistication to them but I can leave that discussion out of this epistle. The compressed air nozzles are needed to quickly bring the hull to planing speed. It must quickly crawl out of the water into planning attitude so a lot of air is needed to get her quickly up to speed and planing.

 

The venturi air flows can be controlled by damper valves so that the boat can be slowed down and not slide into the trough in front of the wave on which it is surfing.

 

The stern is equipped with large trim surfaces to help keep the stern configuration above the water at high speed to prevent wake turbulence while planing or surfing.

 

Along the straight flat sides (having 3.5o tumble home) are sets of water ballast scoops that are filled with water from the lee side just before the boat tacks so that the ballast water taken in ends up on the high side after the tacking maneuver has been completed. In this manner between 0 and 10,000 lbs can be taken on board as is needed according to the wind force and sails flown. Just before the next tack is negotiated this water is dumped and water is again taken on at the lee side just before the boat tacks. This disposable ballast weight is the equivalent of having up to 50 people sitting on the high rail. Idle crew members can also ride on the high rail. The wide-beamed and very stable boat thus can carry enormous amounts of sail and still retain a minimum heeling angle.

 

The idea is to keep the boat as level as possible to trap the air under the hull as long as possible. A 5o heel should be the maximum allowed. Tacking into the wind, however, should be exercised at low speed so that the relative wind comes more from the upwind direction allowing the boat to point steeper into the wind. The sides have a 4o angle with the lengthwise centerline of the hull; so that the lee side becomes keel when she heels. When the boat sails on the wind the boat is thus moving upwind at an increased angle of 4o; or really, creating a 0o drift angle.. This is an advantage over any other sailing vessel. 

 

Steering is done by rotors. Two rotors are used; one up front and one near the stern.  The helmsman only has to turn the rotors about half the angle of a conventional rudder. The great advantage of these rotors is that one can turn both rotors upwind while sailing close to the wind causing the boat to crab or crawl upwind while yet retaining full efficiency of the sails.

 

The water ballast tanks are also important in trimming the hull while surfing. The stern should be a little deeper in the water for good steering and planing stability. While surfing large ocean swells the stern rotor is locked into mid position to serve as a course stabilizer while the front rotor and/or the outer trim surfaces at the stern can be used to control the heading angle with respect to the movement of the swell. 

 

This hull can climb onto the front of a swell and ride it all across the ocean in the trade wind sections of the world or at the fringes of heavy storms, and then it is making between 45 to 55 knots over long stretches. Since this hull can surf any time during bad weather there is never a chance of it capsizing. It is always under full control while riding with the brute forces of wind and swells.

 

In mono-hull design it is in a super class by itself.

 

This super shallow, super fast hull design was derived from my 42 ft cruising hull design. I had a 1/8 scale radio-controlled model made of this 42 ft LOA, cruising boat that has forward and stern rudders. That model hull did go to windward as anticipated; although it is a very difficult task to perform with a radio-controlled sailing model.

 

 

I designed this super shallow, super-fast hull in 2006 and in 2007 applied for US patent. I was in quandary whether to advertise this hull as the patent is only good in the US.

 

I designed this super shallow, super fast, radical hull at DWL 50 ft; the optimum length to surf the hull on large ocean swells and also as a cruising sailboat. This cruising hull can surf across an ocean, plane while going to windward and can sail steeper into the wind than any other vessel. As you can see from the picture above this hull has no keel, no permanent ballast and no conventional rudder. The hull will perform as a surfing platform, sailing platform and motor vessel.

 

The super shallow, super fast hull design lends itself to sailing craft to about 300 ft, motor vessels up to 500 ft for both inland and coastal use. As a surfing platform it can be designed in lengths of 25 ft to about 85 ft. As a surfing vessel it must comfortably fit on the forward slope of the swells it is designed to ride.

 

The skin of the bottom of the hull shown in the accompanying figure can be fabricated using conventional methods using monel or copper-clad steel, aluminum or conceivably fiberglass. The reason for such materials is that the bottom must always be as smooth and clean as possible in order to get all the speed producing innovations to work right.

 

The hull will go over 50 knots at sustained speeds with sufficient wind and/or trade wind like swells. This particular hull design (LWL of 50 ft) is 18 ft wide at the turn of the bows into the sides and the beam continues to increase from the bows at about a 4o angle with respect to the centerline to reach a beam of about 21 ft at the stern. The bottom is flat. The hull has no keel, no permanent internal ballast, and it has no conventional rudder. Hull static draft is 1 ft and including the steering fins the draft is about 1½ ft. She begins to plane almost immediately reducing overall draft to about 10 inches. She has German-design, vari props that go automatically in vane stand when the motors stop and automatically deploy when the motors gears are engaged in forward. Once the motor gear lever has been placed in forward there is no need to use the motor gear shift as the prop has its own forward and reverse lever. Hydro jet propulsion is also a good choice.

 

The hull design shown is 59 ft LOA. The flat bottom incorporates two steering and course stabilizing rotors on which sets of fins are mounted. These rotors are in lieu of a rudder. They are also used while planing or surfing the hull. I have some preliminary ideas and designs to raise or hinge some of the fins on the rotor to reduce wetted surface at high speed. Any one rotor also serves as spare rudder in case the other malfunctions.

 

The bows sections and the intersections of the bottom with the sides are equipped with multiple sets of pressurized air nozzles and the hull is equipped with multiple sets of crosswise venturi slots that suck air under the hull in great quantities as the hull speed increases above 10 knots. The venturi arrays have much more sophistication to them but I can leave that discussion out of this epistle. The air nozzles are needed to quickly bring the hull to planing speed. It must quickly crawl out of the water into planning attitude so a lot of air is needed to get her up to speed and planing fast. The onboard air tanks could be charged by manpower grinding away before start and during a race or be charged by the propulsion motors.

 

The venturi air flow can be controlled by a damper valve so that the boat can be slowed down and not slide into the trough in front of the wave on which it is surfing.

 

The stern is equipped with three large trim surfaces to help keep the stern configuration above the water at high speed to prevent wake turbulence while planing or surfing.

 

Along the straight flat sides (having 3.5o tumble home) are sets of water ballast scopes that are filled with water from the lee side just before the boat tacks so that the ballast water taken in ends up on the high side after the tacking maneuver has been completed. In this manner between 0 and 10,000 lbs can be taken on board as is needed according to the wind force and sails flown. Just before the next tack is negotiated this water is dumped and water again taken on at the lee side just before the boat tacks again. This disposable ballast weight is the equivalent of having up to 50 people sitting on the high rail. Idle crew members can also ride on the high rail. The wide-beamed and very stable boat thus can carry enormous amounts of sail and still retain a minimum heeling angle.

 

The idea is to keep the boat as level as possible to trap the air under the hull as long as possible. A 5o heel should be the maximum allowed. The sides have a 4o angle with the centerline of the hull; so that the lee side becomes keel when she heels. When the boat sails on the wind the boat is thus moving upwind at an increased angle of 4o.

 

Steering is done by rotors. Two rotors are used; one up front and one near the stern.  The helmsman only has to turn the rotors about half the angle of a conventional rudder. The great advantage of these rotors is that one can turn both rotors upwind while tacking into the wind causing the boat to crab or crawl upwind while yet retaining full efficiency of the sails.

 

The water ballast tanks are also important in trimming the hull while surfing. The stern should be a little deeper in the water for good steering stability. While surfing large ocean swells the stern rotor is locked into mid position to serve as a course stabilizer while the front rotor and/or the outer trim surfaces at the stern can be used to control the heading angle with respect to the swell.

 

There are a number of other innovations in this super shallow, super fast hull design that control heel and speed, such as a speed brake.

 

The next great feature is that this hull can climb onto the front of a swell and ride it all across the ocean in the trade wind sections of the world or at the fringes of heavy storms, and then it is making between 45 to 55 knots over long stretches. Since this hull can surf any time during bad weather there is never a chance of it capsizing. It is always under full control while riding with the brute force of wind and swells.

 

In mono-hull design it is in a class by itself.

 

This super shallow, super fast hull design was derived from my 42 ft cruising hull design. I had a 1/8 scale radio-controlled model made of this 42 ft LOA, cruising boat that has forward and stern rudders. That hull did go to windward as anticipated; although it is a very difficult task to perform with a radio-controlled sailing model. I knew that I had to get rid of the keel to make the dual rudder configuration work more effectively. That is why I ended up designing a super shallow hull with no rudders, but instead with two rotor, a flat bottom and no permanent ballast.

Below find shots of that radio-controlled model. The jib has a flexible plastic tube in the seam of the foot that works very well. That design gave me the idea for the super-shallow, super-fast design. The rudders in the line drawing are painted blue for easy identification.
 
The super shallow, super  fast hull is really too complex a design to test satisfactorily as a model. If a model was to be made it has to be at least a 1/3 scale so that a person can actually sit in it and manually operate it. I just do not have the financial support to pursue a model test for this one. I am, however quite confident that this hull performs as I say it will. Below are some pictures of the cruising hull model and its rudders.

 By Hans van Krieken
 

Among others, I designed this hull also: having lived on a sailboat for years, and some with my wife, I know this hull makes a fantastic cruising sailboat. There is a 50 ft version of it as well.

Lines drawing of 42 ft long hull

 

stern rudder detail of 42 ft yacht    The second rudder forward of keel

 

remote controlled 1/8 scale model being tested    Remote controlled model of 42 ft hull being tested

 

This roomy cruising hull and its 50.5 ft sister are the best. I know that this design can and will sail around the world easily five times in a thirty years period and will keep its owners happy as a lark living on it. It is the best there is because it is designed according to the best scantling standards using the best of woods; indeed it is the best because it is designed in wood. However, when the hull is built upside down, a mold can be easily drawn from it and a hundred plastic tubs drawn from it as has been done to create the model.

 

42 ft sailing yacht I designed. 

 

Hans van Krieken also wrote two books, "The truth About Reality--Beyond God and Religion" and "Win Bets Consistently". Two books that should not be missed by wise and prudent people. The books cross feed on each other and will expand insight in physical reality beyond what this world can ever teach. Please be wise and do not miss these books. For sale from www.Xlibrish.com

     The book that will safe from hell                    If you need to bet read this book

                 The Truth About Reality - book of all ages!            Win Bets Consistently - teaches how to be your own force

Carol, also, composed a book. It is the neatest and handiest book in my possession. It is called "Usernames & Passwords At Hand". It is the way to organize your web-related connections. I could not live without this handy book anymore. Get yourself a copy at www.usernames-and-passwords-book . com. I like the soft-cover version the best.

Hans van Krieken or Carol can be reached at 828-393-8569 USA.

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Created 1-1-2009,   Revised 07-14-2010